Copyright 2018 - #

Contains all publications for 2008.

Linking forest tenure and anthropogenic factors with institutions and the effectiveness of management in Mpigi forests, central Uganda

Abstract

This paper reveals the investigated effects of forest tenure and physical and socioeconomic correlates on conservation and management of forests in the Mpigi District, central Uganda. Tree diversity was surveyed in 156 nested plots of 20 m

Honey quality as affected by handling, processing and marketing channels

kugonza, D.R. and Nabakabya, D. 2008. Honey quality as affected by handling, processing and marketing channels. Tropicultura 26(2): 113

Indigenous chicken flocks of Eastern Uganda: I. Productivity, management and strategies for better performance.

Abstract

A study was conducted to determine the productivity and management of indigenous chickens of Kumi district in Eastern Uganda. Eighty households were randomly selected to respond to a standard questionnaire.
The average flock size per household was three cocks, six hens and four chicks. Sexual maturity is attained at 5.5 and 6.5 months among male and female chickens respectively, with age at first egg ranging between 5.5-7 months. Egg hatchability varied widely between farmers with an overall mean of 90%. Clutch sizes ranged between 4-19 eggs per clutch, with a mean of 13 eggs. Chickens were acquired through purchase (65.6%), gifts (26.3%), or in exchange for labour. Scavenging was the major feeding system, seasonally supplemented with cereal grain. The majority of the farmers (87.5%) provided birds with drinking water. Death of chicks was prevalent (73%) and was mainly attributed to Newcastle disease (70%), with most of the mortality being observed during the dry season (62%). Survival of chickens was significantly affected (P<0.001) by feeding level, and strongly correlated (r = 0.83) with the housing system. Housing and feeding had significant effects on duration between laying cycles (P<0.001), how chickens were acquired (P<0.01), and the uses to which the chickens were put (P<0.001). Chickens and eggs are mainly used to generate household income and for home consumption. In some households, chickens are exchanged for goats and subsequently, for cattle.
Our findings indicate that the indigenous chicken is a major resource in Teso, Uganda. The performance of these indigenous chickens would significantly improve with better feeding, housing and health management. Chicken farmers should be empowered through training and provision of capital credit, the latter of which should be well informed by data on the chicken production cycle.

Key words: Scavenging, eggs, feeding, health households, nutrition, rural

The potential of Ankole cattle abattoir ovaries for in vitro embryo production

Abstract

A study was carried out to determine the potential of abattoir ovaries from Ankole cattle cows for in vitro embryo production. Ankole cattle cows (n = 109) due for slaughter at a local abattoir were selected. The body weight, age, body condition, pregnancy status and presence of corpus luteum (CL) for each animal were recorded. Pairs of ovaries were collected from the animals and transported in PBS supplemented with 0.5 mg/ml gentamycin. The ovaries were weighed and the number of vesicular follicles (2-10 mm) on the surface recorded. Oocytes were aspirated with 18G needle and a 5 ml syringe, washed with PBS, counted and the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) graded. Data were analysed using SAS, 2003 and means were separated using Fisher

Natumanya, R., D. Owiny and kugonza, D.R. 2008. . African Journal of Animal and Biomedical Sciences

The Ankole cattle in Uganda: productivity and morphology in three production systems.

Abstract

Phenotypic characterization is critical in breed improvement and conservation. To determine the performance and morphological features of Ankole cattle in three livestock production systems (LPS) of Uganda, 248 farms were studied. Height at withers (HW), heart girth (HG), body length (BL), ear length, horn length (HL), distance between horn tips (HS) and body weight (BW) were then measured on 120 bulls and 180 cows. Data were analysed using LPS (crop livestock, agropastoral, pastoral), county (Gomba, Kazo, Kiboga, Mawoggola, Nyabushozi) and sex (females, males) as main factors. In the results, age at sexual maturity was 23.6

kugonza, D.R., Okeyo, A.M., Nabasirye, M. and Hanotte, O. 2008. T 10th World Conference on Animal Production (Cape Town) Proceedings.

Genetic diversity, husbandry, selection criteria and verification of kinship assignment of Ankole cattle populations in Uganda.

kugonza, D.R. 2008. Genetic diversity, husbandry, selection criteria and verification of kinship assignment of Ankole cattle populations in Uganda. PhD Thesis, Makerere University.

Performance of groing indigenous goats fed diets based on urban market crop wastes.

Abstract

The effect of feeding diets including market crop wastes (sweet potato vines (Ipomoea batatas) and scarlet eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum)) on growth and digestibility was studied using 32 indigenous intact growing male goats. Adding elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), maize bran and Leucaena leucocephala leaves, four isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets (Sweet potato vines, Solanum, Mixed and Control) were formulated. After the growth trial, 12 goats were randomly selected for a digestibility trial with the same diets, and 8 goats for a feed preference test comparing the market wastes and elephant grass. Crude protein (CP) intake was highest (P<0.05) for the Control (48 g/day) and lowest for the Sweet potato vines diet (23 g/day). Average daily gain was between 11.0 and 14.2 g/day, and similar between diets. The DM and CP digestibilities of the diets were 0.56 and 0.56 (Control), 0.62 and 0.56 (Mixed), 0.59 and 0.49 (Sweet potato vines), and 0.54 and 0.45 (Solanum), respectively. Faecal and urinary N excretions were highest in goats fed the Sweet potato vines and Solanum diets. Eggplant wastes were the least (P<0.05) preferred. On average the goats spent 5% of their 8-hour time eating eggplant wastes, 34% on sweet potato vines and 36% on elephant grass. Growth performance and N retention were low due to the low intake of feed, especially eggplant wastes.

C.B. Katongole, E.N Sabiiti, F. B Bareeba , I. Ledin (2008): Performance of groing indigenous goats fed diets based on urban market crop wastes. Trop AnimalHealth Production(2009) 41:329- 336, DOI 10:1007/s11250-008-9193-7

Nutritional Characterisation of some tropical urban market crop wastes.

Abstract

There are different sources for the generation of solid waste, and marketplaces are considered one of them. Fruit and vegetable waste (FV) from a marketplace in Colombia was quantitatively and nutritionally characterized to contribute to its use in bovine feeding and to contribute minimizing its environmental impact. The evaluation was carried out 7 days per week during 4 periods of the year. FV was grouped by cluster analysis using SAS

Katongole , CB, Bareeba,FB,, EN Sabiiti 2008 and Ledin I Nutritional Characterisation of some tropical urban market crop wastes. Animal feed science, 55,13-20 DOI 10. 1016/SO301- 6226(98) 00127-4

Long-term perspectives on forest conservation: lessons from research in Kibale National Park. In: Science and Conservation in African Forests

Lwanga, J.S. & Isabirye-Basuta, G. (2008).Long-term perspectives on forest conservation: lessons from research in Kibale National Park. In: Science and Conservation in African Forests: The Benefits of Long-term Research. (R. Wrangham and E. Ross eds.) pp. 63-74.

Primate populations and their interactions with changing habitats.

Abstract

Given that 90% of nonhuman primates depend on tropical forests, the

Isabirye-Basuta, G.M. & Lwanga, J.S. (2008). Primate populations and their interactions with changing habitats. International Journal of Primatology, 29:35


Youtube


Copyright ©

      Makerere University College of Agricultural

and Environmental Sciences

All Rights Reserved

 

      Terms of use   |  Privacy Policy   |  Contact Us

  1.                                           Facebook
  2.                                           Twitter
  3.                                           Youtube
  4.                                           Linkedin