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Contains all publications of the year 2009.

Amending Soils with Hydrogels Increases the Biomass of Nine Tree Species under Non water Stress Conditions

Abstract

The classical aim of the application of super absorbent polyacrylate (SAPs) hydrogels is the prolonging of plant survival under water stress. Their effect on plant growth during non-water stress conditions is not known. This study examined the root and shoot biomass of seedlings of nine tree species; Eucalyptus grandis, Eucalyptus citriodora, Pinus caribaea, Araucaria cunninghamii, Melia volkensii, Grevillea robusta, Azadirachta indica, Maesopsis eminii and Terminalia superba. The seedlings were potted in five soil types; sand, sandy loam, loam, silt loam and clay. These were amended at two hydrogel levels: 0.2 and 0.4% w/w and grown under controlled conditions in a green house. Root and shoot growth responses of the seedlings were determined by measuring the dry weight of the roots, stems, leaves and twigs. The addition of either 0.2 or 0.4% hydrogel to the five soil types resulted in a significant increase of the root dry weight (p a 0.001) in eight tree species compared to the controls after 8 wk of routine watering. Also, the dry weight of stems and leaves and twigs were significantly (p a 0.001) higher in the nine tree species potted in hydrogel amended soil types than in the hydrogel free controls. These results suggested that hydrogel amendment enhances the efficiency of water uptake and utilization of photosynthates of plants grown in soils which have water contents close to field capacity.

 

Amending Soils with Hydrogels Increases the Biomass of Nine Tree Species under Non water Stress Conditions

Abstract

The classical aim of the application of super absorbent polyacrylate (SAPs) hydrogels is the prolonging of plant survival under water stress. Their effect on plant growth during non-water stress conditions is not known. This study examined the root and shoot biomass of seedlings of nine tree species; Eucalyptus grandis, Eucalyptus citriodora, Pinus caribaea, Araucaria cunninghamii, Melia volkensii, Grevillea robusta, Azadirachta indica, Maesopsis eminii and Terminalia superba. The seedlings were potted in five soil types; sand, sandy loam, loam, silt loam and clay. These were amended at two hydrogel levels: 0.2 and 0.4% w/w and grown under controlled conditions in a green house. Root and shoot growth responses of the seedlings were determined by measuring the dry weight of the roots, stems, leaves and twigs. The addition of either 0.2 or 0.4% hydrogel to the five soil types resulted in a significant increase of the root dry weight (p a 0.001) in eight tree species compared to the controls after 8 wk of routine watering. Also, the dry weight of stems and leaves and twigs were significantly (p a 0.001) higher in the nine tree species potted in hydrogel amended soil types than in the hydrogel free controls. These results suggested that hydrogel amendment enhances the efficiency of water uptake and utilization of photosynthates of plants grown in soils which have water contents close to field capacity.

 

Beekeeping: Theory and Practice. Fountain Improved Farming Series. Farming Guide No.8.

kugonza, D.R. 2009.

Okuganyulwa mu Bulunzi bw

Mutetikka, D. and kugonza, D.R. 2009.

Effects of hive type and tree shade on colonization rate and pest prevalence of honeybee (Apis Mellifera) colonies in Central Uganda.

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of hive type and shading on the rate of hive colonization by natural bee swarms and the level of pest prevalence in the post colonization period. Twenty four bee hives, six of each of the Langstroth, Top-bar, Grass and Basket type were used. All the hives were baited using melted beeswax and three hives of each type were sited either under tree shade or in the open sun. Grass hives were colonized significantly (P < 0.05) earlier (14.8 + 0.01 days) than the Langstroth and Top bar hives (56.5 + 0.11 days). Hives located in the shade were colonised within 40.8 + 2.7 days, significantly (P < 0.05) earlier than hives in the open (47.8 + 2.3 days). The colonies in hives placed in the open absconded earlier (P < 0.05) than those in the shade. Black ants (Monomorium minimum) were present in 29.2% of the hives where colony absconding was observed, followed by mites and wasps in that order of severity. While only 66% of the Top bar hives were attacked by black ants, all Langstroth hives were attacked by both black ants and mites. Only 33% of the Grass hives were attacked by the two major pests. Contrary to common belief, we found pests of honeybees in central Uganda. These included the wax moth (Galleria mellonella), the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida), mites and black ants. This study recommends that hives, especially the non-traditional types, should be sited in the shade. Grass hives should be a priority over other types since they colonised earliest and are least attacked by pests. We also recommend strict hive hygiene to control the mites, black ants and other pests that attack the bees. kugonza D.R., Kamatara, K.B., Nabakabya, D. and Kikonyogo, S. 2009. (Apis Mellifera) colonies in Central Uganda. African Journal of Animal and Biomedical Sciences .

Ankole cattle pastoralists are right when they claim to accurately memorise pedigrees of their herds: Molecular evidence and implications

Kugonza, D.R., Jianlin, H., Kiwuwa, G.H. and Hanotte, O. 2009. Ankole cattle pastoralists are right when they claim to accurately memorise pedigrees of their herds: Molecular evidence and implications. 2nd Annual Research and Innovations Dissemination Conference (Kampala) Proceedings.

Analysis of the production and marketing channels of local chickens and their products in central Uganda. Final Project Report.

Kyarisiima, C.C., kugonza, D.R. and Magala, H. 2009. Analysis of the production and marketing channels of local chickens and their products in central Uganda. Final Project Report. Network of Uganda Researchers and Research Users (NURRU), Kampala, Uganda.

Harnessing Community Capitals for Livelihood Enhancement: Experiences from a Livelihood Program in Rural Uganda.

Abstract

This study assesses how community capitals can be harnessed to improve food security using the

Sseguya, H. Mazur, E.R and Masinde, D. (2009). Harnessing Community Capitals for Livelihood Enhancement: Experiences from a Livelihood Program in Rural Uganda. Community Development 40(2): 123-138.

Resilience to Global Economic Crises and Climate Trends: Impacts of a Livelihood Support Program in Rural Uganda.

Mazur, R.E., Sseguya, H., Abbott, E.A. and Masinde, D. M. (2009). Resilience to Global Economic Crises and Climate Trends: Impacts of a Livelihood Support Program in Rural Uganda. Paper Presented at the 72nd Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, July 30 - August 2, 2009.

Resilience to Global Economic Crises and Climate Trends: Impacts of a Livelihood Support Program in Rural Uganda.

Mazur, R.E., Sseguya, H., Abbott, E.A. and Masinde, D. M. (2009). Resilience to Global Economic Crises and Climate Trends: Impacts of a Livelihood Support Program in Rural Uganda. Paper Presented at the 72nd Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, July 30 - August 2, 2009.


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